Upon Westminster Bridge | Aster Classes

Chapter 10, Upon Westminster Bridge, fyjc, 11th std, English, Maharashtra board,

A bridge connects people on either side of a river or valleys in cities or villages. Discuss with your partner the importance of a bridge to both the cities and the villages and complete the table.

CitiesVillages
  
  
  

SOLUTION

 CitiesVillages
i.Connects two harbours for easy commutingTo cross a river on foot
ii.Connects two places for transportation of goodsCarry goods to sell in the nearby market
iii.To by-pass traffic congestion on roadsTo enjoy the scenic beauty
iv.Architectural and cultural significance; tourist attractionAccessibility to basic amenities like medical help in case of emergencies and schools of higher education.
v.Social connectors; enabling commerce and interaction between people of different regionsEase and safety of travel is closely related to the upliftment of remote villages

Building a bridge needs careful planning. Think about what goes on before the actual construction begins.

  • Proper planning
  • ________________
  • ________________
  • ________________
  • ________________

SOLUTION

  • Proper planning
  • Deciding the exact location to build the bridge
  • Taking permissions and completing paperwork
  • Gathering materials for the construction
  • Conducting necessary tests before construction
  • Cost Estimation
  • Selecting the type of foundation depending upon scientific analysis of soil, etc.
  • Redirecting necessary traffic to ensure smooth construction.

You might have visited a bridge. Complete the web describing the sights you could see from the bridge.

SOLUTION


For preparing questions based on the poem, an overall understanding of the poem is a must. Discuss with your partner and prepare a set of five questions.

For example:

  1. What is the name of the bridge?
  2. ________________________________
  3. ________________________________
  4. ________________________________
  5. ________________________________
  6. ________________________________

SOLUTION

  1. What is the name of the bridge?
  2. Which city has been referred to in the poem?
  3. What time of the day is the poet talking about?
  4. Why does the poet call the air ‘smokeless’?
  5. What does the poet mean by the last two lines of the poem?
  6. Identify the poetic devices used by the poet in this poem.

Choose the correct alternative for the given line. Focus on the inference of the poet.

1.‘Earth has not anything to show more fair:’

The line means – _________________.

  • The poet thinks that the place was not so good.
  • The poet thinks that there is another place that is more beautiful than this.
  • The poet thinks that there is no place on the earth which is as beautiful as this one.

2.‘Dull would he be of soul who could pass by’

The line means – __________________.

  • One can walk over the bridge and ignore the surrounding beauty
  • One can halt at the place to enjoy the beauty.
  • Anyone with an appreciative mind would not be able to ignore the beauty.

‘Earth has not anything to show more fair.’

This line expresses the poet’s feelings. The sight he saw from the bridge is beautiful. There are a few more lines similar to the above. With the help of your partner find them and discuss what they express.

SOLUTION

  1. ‘A sight so touching.’
    The line expresses the poet’s feelings of admiration.
  2. ‘Never did sun more beautifully steep In his first splendour, valley, rock, or hill;’
    The line expresses the poet’s feelings of wonder at the effect created by the first rays of the sun hitting the city. The poet feels as if the sun had never shone so beautifully over any natural form the way it did on the structures of the city that morning.
  3. ‘Ne’er saw I, never felt, a calm, so deep!’
    The line expresses the poet’s feelings of calmness after witnessing nature’s beauty from the bridge.

The poem creates a delightful picture of the city, rich in its natural beauty. Work in pairs, groups and pick out the lines from the poem which give the pictorial effect to the poem. Write it in your own words.

SOLUTION

The poem creates a delightful picture of London by depicting ships, towers, domes, theatres, and temples vividly; in front of our eyes. These structures lie open to the clear sky and glitter brightly in the sunshine. The poet paints a picture of the first rays of the sun in all its splendour (glory) falling on these structures. The Thames flowing at its own pace and the silent houses before the beginning of a new day all add to the imagery of a still and sleeping city.


Find out the words and phrases which describe the following. One is done for you.

sighttouching in its majesty
air 
river 
house 
morning 
sun 

SOLUTION

sighttouching in its majesty
airsmokeless
riverSweet Will
houseAsleep
morningsilent and bare
sunSteep in his splendour


‘The city now, doth, like garment wear’. The poet imagines that the city is wearing a beautiful garment. Hence, the figure of speech is personification. Find out more examples of personification from the poem.

SOLUTION

  1. An example of Personification can be found in the line,
    This City now doth, like a garment, wear The beauty of the morning;
    In this line, the city is said to wear the beauty of the morning like a garment. Thus, the city has been compared to a person wearing clothes.
  2. “In his first splendour, valley, rock, or hill;”
    Personification
    – ‘The sun’ has been personified using the male pronoun ‘his’.
  3. The river glideth at his own sweet will:
    Personification – The river has been given the animate quality of having its own ‘will’.

Dull would he be of soul who could pass by.’

This line of the poem can be rewritten as:

‘He would be of a dull soul.’

The figure of speech is known as ‘Inversion’.

Find out one more example of Inversion from the poem.

SOLUTION

  1. “Dull would he be of soul who could pass by”
    Inversion – The words in the line have been rearranged for poetic effect. The correct order should be “He could pass by would be of the dull soul”.
  2. “Never did sun more beautifully steep”
    Inversion – The words in the line have been rearranged for poetic effect. The correct order should be “The sun never did more beautifully steep”.
  3. “Ne’er saw I, never felt, a calm, so deep!”
    Inversion – The words in the line have been rearranged for poetic effect. The correct order should be “I ne’er (never) saw, never felt, a calm so deep!”.

The poem is a Petrarchan Sonnet. The poem is divided into two parts –

  1. An Octave
    The first part comprising eight lines.
  2. A sestet
    The second part comprising six lines.

Read the first four lines of the poem. The rhyme scheme is a b b a. Read the rhyme scheme for the next four lines. It is a b b a. Now read the first three lines of the sestet and note the rhyme scheme. It is c d c. The rhyme scheme of the last three lines is d c d. This is the common design of a Petrarchan Sonnet.


This is a Petrarchan Sonnet. Complete the given table by giving examples from the poem.

FeaturesExamples / Lines
Objects used 
Praise/blames 
Metaphor 
Simile 
Personification 
Number of lines 
Rhyme scheme 

SOLUTION

FeaturesExamples / Lines
Objects usedEarth, city, sun, ships, towers, domes, theatres, temples, valley, rock, hill, river, houses.
Praise/blamesA sight so touching in its majesty / The beauty of the morning / Ne’er saw I, never felt, a calm, so deep!
MetaphorAnd all that mighty heart is lying still!
Similelike a garment, wear / The beauty of the morning
PersonificationThe city now, doth, like a garment wear /river glideth at his own sweet will / houses seem asleep
Number of linesfourteen
Rhyme schemeabbaabba cdcdcd

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